New York Times Chocolate Chip Cookies

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New York Times Chocolate Chip Cookies are the BEST chocolate chip cookie ever. Perfect crisp edges and a soft ooey gooey chocolate middle!

stack of new york times chocolate chip cookies


 

I have seen this New York Times chocolate chip cookie recipe all over the internet and Pinterest and was always wondering..could it really be that good? I decided it was time to finally bust out my copy of the New York Times cookbook and make up a batch myself. And OH. MY. GOD. you all were right. 

The best. Done. You can stop searching.

It has the perfect crisp edges and the soft cookie center that all other chocolate chip cookies dream of having. You know that cookie you would drive miles for in a snow storm for. 

  • Bread flour – this type of flour has a higher protein content so it helps to create a chewier texture then if you were to simply use all purpose flour.
  • Cake flour – this type of flour has a lower protein content so it helps to create a tenderness. If you don’t have any, you can make your own cake flour. For more ways to use up that bag of cake flour, check out my 41 Cake Flour Recipes!
  • Baking Powder
  • Baking Soda
  • Salt
  • Unsalted butter – it’s important to use unsalted butter because you can control the amount of salt in your recipe this way. 
  • Granulated sugar
  • Light brown sugar
  • Eggs
  • Vanilla extract
  • Chocolate chips – I have used semi-sweet chips, but milk chocolate as well. You can also use a combination of regular chips, mini chocolate chips, discs, chunks, and bars chopped up. I like using a combination so that I get chocolate of every shape and size in every single bite. Basically pure heaven. 
chocolate chip cookies on a cutting board
  • Measure your flours correctly. Too much flour can result in a dense cookie. Don’t just scoop the flour directly into your measuring cup. This can result in a major over measurement! After you have spooned the flour in, then use a knife to level off the flour. Don’t tap the sides of the measuring cup, or pack your flour down. Both can also result in too much flour. You can read a full tutorial on how to measure flour here
  • Use the flour the recipe calls for. This recipe actually calls for two kinds of flour- cake flour and bread flour. Different flours can act differently in cookies. And these two acting in unison are what make for a chewy but soft cookie all in one. 
  • Butter softened to room temperature. Does the temperature of the butter matter? It matter so much this quote was added to end of the recipe in the cookbook.”Butter is like the concrete you use to pour the foundation of a building. So it’s very important to get it right: the temperature, the texture, and aeration” So in other words…yea it matters. It matters so much I did an entire post on how butter temperature affects cookiesThe butter needs to be softened to room temperature, which mean you can slightly indent your thumb in the butter but shouldn’t easily smoosh all the way through. If you forget to take your butter out in time, cut the butter into small chunks and leave out at room temperature. It will soften much faster this way. When you cream the butter and sugars together it’s also important to let this happen for a whole 5 minutes to allow enough air into the batter and helps leavens the cookies. For 3 quick ways to soften your butter, you can read this post.
  • Chill the dough. This dough gets chilled for at least 24 hours up to 72 hours. Chilling the dough results in a nice thick and tall cookie that spreads less in the oven. Basically? Perfection. I actually tested a cookie straight from the bowl to see if it made a difference. The cookies that were chilled definitely spread less, but to be honest, even NOT chilled these were still THE BEST. Do yourself a favor, and scoop the cookie dough first before refrigerating. Unless you have Herculian arms, you will have a heck of a time trying to scoop the dough after if it’s been chilled. Scoop, then chill. 
  • Use a large 2-inch cookie scoop and scoop giant balls of cookie dough. Why? Because bigger cookies are better than small ones? Ok, well yes they are. But, there is actually science behind it too. The larger cookie helps to give those perfect crispy edges and soft ooey, gooey, middle we all want. You could also measure out your cookie dough into 3 1/2 ounce balls of dough to ensure they are all the same perfect size. Who would be such a nerd and do such a thing? Oh wait, I did. Moving on…

For more tips, check out my 6 tips for perfect chocolate chip cookies

How to make these New York Times Chocolate Chip Cookies – step by step 

For this cookie recipe you want to start by sifting your dry ingredients together. I’m not the biggest fan of it, but when a recipe from Jacques Torres sift. I sift. Who am I to argue with perfection? So get your sifter out and spend the extra minute or two and do it right! You won’t regret it. 

dry ingredients in a sifter

Then you want to cream your butter and sugars together for about 3 minutes until light and fluffy. Proper creaming with properly softened butter is what helps to aerate the mixture. The sugar basically punches holes into the butter creating air pockets, which then will fill with the gasses created with the leavening agents which can help create some lift in the cookies. 

Once the mixture has properly creamed together, then add in your room temperature eggs, and vanilla extract. Make sure they are thoroughly mixed in. You want to make sure your eggs are room temperature so they don’t seize up the butter mixture.

Pro tip: You can place the eggs in a bowl of warm water for 10 minutes before using them to bring them to room temperature quickly.

cookie dough in bowl

Then add in your flour mixture and mix just until combined. Over mixing can result in more gluten (protein in the flour that creates structure) being formed which can cause for tough cookies to happen in the end. 

cookie dough in bowl with no chocolate chips

You can then stir in the chocolate chips at this point. Again just stir enough to mix them in and then stop mixing. 

cookie dough with chocolate chips in bowl

Next you need to scoop the cookies. You can make them small or big. I vote big. But that’s your call. And then comes the tough part. Chilling the dough for 24 hours. I know. You have to wait a whole day for the best cookies ever but it will be worth it. 

cookie dough balls on cookie sheet

Why did my cookies spread so much?

Cookie spreading is a bummer. There 8 reasons that I can think of why your cookies spread too much and are flat. If your cookies do spread in the oven, you can try this little trick I picked up from Sally’s Baking Addiction, which is to take them out of the oven and take a spoon and press the edges of the cookie inward.

Can I freeze these cookies?

Yes and you should. When they take 24 hours to chill, it’s much easier to freeze them. You can freeze them baked or unbaked. 

To freeze unbaked: Scoop the cookies onto a cookie sheet, and freeze solid. Then place into a sealable plastic bag. You can bake frozen, without thawing, but add on a few extra minutes of baking time.

To freeze baked: Allow the cookies to cool completely. Then when ready to eat, allow to thaw. I like to pop them into the microwave for about 20 seconds to bring them back to ooey gooey life. 

Do I need to chill the dough? 

For optimal taste, texture and reduced spreading then YES, YES YES! You need to chill the dough. You can try chilling the dough for less time if you are in a hurry. But if you do bake them right away then it might affect the spreading, and overall texture.

Why do my chocolate chip cookies get hard?

This could be because you overbaked the cookies. If the dough is too warm (remember that chilling time!) then it could cause them too spread too much resulting in a cookie that gets too thin and gets too crispy and hard. Your oven temperature may also be too high. I recommend using an oven thermometer to ensure your oven is running at the correct temperature.

stack of new york times chocolate chip cookies

To make these NY Times chocolate chip cookies you will need:

                                         

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New York Times Chocolate Chip Cookies

The best chocolate chip cookie with perfect crispy edges and soft ooey gooey middle!
5 from 7 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: American
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Chilling time: 1 day
Total Time: 40 minutes
Servings: 18 large 5-inch cookies
Calories: 359kcal

Ingredients

  • 2 cups minus 2 tablespoons (8 1/2 ounces) cake flour
  • 1 ⅔ cups (8 1/2 ounces) bread flour
  • 1 ¼ teaspoons baking soda
  • 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 ½ teaspoons coarse salt
  • 2 ½ sticks (1 1/4 cups) unsalted butter
  • 1 ¼ cups (10 ounces) light brown sugar
  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons (8 ounces) granulated sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • 1 ¼ pounds bittersweet chocolate disks at least 60 percent cacao content see note

Instructions

  • Sift flours, baking soda, baking powder and salt into a bowl. Set aside.
  • Using a mixer fitted with paddle attachment, cream butter and sugars together until very light, about 5 minutes. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing well after each addition. Stir in the vanilla. Reduce speed to low, add dry ingredients and mix until just combined, 5 to 10 seconds. Drop chocolate pieces in and incorporate them without breaking them. Press plastic wrap against dough and refrigerate for 24 to 36 hours. Dough may be used in batches, and can be refrigerated for up to 72 hours.
  • When ready to bake, preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a nonstick baking mat. Set aside.
  • Scoop 6 3 1/2-ounce mounds of dough (the size of generous golf balls) onto baking sheet, making sure to turn horizontally any chocolate pieces that are poking up; it will make for a more attractive cookie. Bake until golden brown but still soft, 18 to 20 minutes. Transfer sheet to a wire rack for 10 minutes, then slip cookies onto another rack to cool a bit more. Repeat with remaining dough, or reserve dough, refrigerated, for baking remaining batches the next day.

Notes

  • Measure your flours correctly. Too much flour can result in a dense cookie. Don’t just scoop the flour directly into your measuring cup. This can result in a major over measurement! After you have spooned the flour in, then use a knife to level off the flour. Don’t tap the sides of the measuring cup, or pack your flour down. Both can also result in too much flour. You can read a full tutorial on how to measure flour here
  • Use the flour the recipe calls for. This recipe actually calls for two kinds of flour- cake flour and bread flour. Different flours can act differently in cookies. And these two acting in unison are what make for a chewy but soft cookie all in one. 
  • Butter softened to room temperature. Does the temperature of the butter matter? It matter so much this quote was added to end of the recipe in the cookbook.”Butter is like the concrete you use to pour the foundation of a building. So it’s very important to get it right: the temperature, the texture, and aeration” So in other words…yea it matters. It matters so much I did an entire post on how butter temperature affects cookiesThe butter needs to be softened to room temperature, which mean you can slightly indent your thumb in the butter but shouldn’t easily smoosh all the way through. If you forget to take your butter out in time, cut the butter into small chunks and leave out at room temperature. It will soften much faster this way. When you cream the butter and sugars together it’s also important to let this happen for a whole 5 minutes to allow enough air into the batter and helps leavens the cookies. For 3 quick ways to soften your butter, you can read this post.
  • Chill the dough. This dough gets chilled for at least 24 hours up to 72 hours. Chilling the dough results in a nice thick and tall cookie that spreads less in the oven. Basically? Perfection. I actually tested a cookie straight from the bowl to see if it made a difference. The cookies that were chilled definitely spread less, but to be honest, even NOT chilled these were still THE BEST. Do yourself a favor, and scoop the cookie dough first before refrigerating. Unless you have Herculian arms, you will have a heck of a time trying to scoop the dough after if it’s been chilled. Scoop, then chill. 
  • Use a large 2-inch cookie scoop and scoop giant balls of cookie dough. Why? Because bigger cookies are better than small ones? Ok, well yes they are. But, there is actually science behind it too. The larger cookie helps to give those perfect crispy edges and soft ooey, gooey, middle we all want. You could also measure out your cookie dough into 3 1/2 ounce balls of dough to ensure they are all the same perfect size. Who would be such a nerd and do such a thing? Oh wait, I did. Moving on…

Nutrition

Calories: 359kcal | Carbohydrates: 66g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 8g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Cholesterol: 22mg | Sodium: 303mg | Potassium: 86mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 45g | Vitamin A: 95IU | Vitamin C: 0.2mg | Calcium: 70mg | Iron: 0.8mg
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28 Comments

  1. Where do you get bread and cake flour? I’ve never seen them at my grocery store.

    Thanks,

    Bethany

    1. Hi Bethany! These are found in most US grocery stores. You could also try purchasing these online- kingarthurflour.com sells these types of flour. Or you can try Amazon!

  2. 5 stars
    Just took them out of the oven. I’m hoping my husband loves them. They look amazing

    1. Oh I’m sure he will Laynie! I haven’t met someone that doesn’t devour these 🙂

  3. 5 stars
    I wouldn’t call it a day if I didn’t find another great chocolate chip cookie recipe! I just can’t get enough of that “soft-inside-crunchy-outside” deliciousness 🙂 Incredible-looking cookies!

    1. Hi Danielle! I agree with you 🙂 And yes this cookie definitely fits the “soft inside crunchy outside” description. Basically perfection!

  4. Amanda Mason says:

    5 stars
    Loving these cookies! And the recipe was super easy to make thanks to your tips and step-by-step processes! This is a keeper recipe for sure!

    1. Hi Amanda! Oh I’m so glad you enjoyed them! And I’m glad you found the tips and step by step process helpful as well 🙂

  5. 5 stars
    My husband has been begging me to make some good choc chip cookies forever and these turned out just perfect!

    1. Oh that’s so awesome to hear Donna! I’m so glad you and your husband enjoyed them!

  6. Marisa F. Stewart says:

    5 stars
    I’ve seen this recipe several times but never attempted to make it. Well, once I saw your post and instructions I decided to try it out. The cookies were fantastic. I’ll be making them again and again.

    1. Oh that’s wonderful Marisa! Glad you liked them 🙂

  7. 5 stars
    You are killing me with these! I am on a three-week refined sugar free regime (only one week to go!) and I browse food all the time, and I was doing fine until I saw these. This is perfect cookie porn for reals!! I can’t wait to get back to eating sugar to make these!

    1. Oh no Eva! I’m so sorry 😉 but these are definitely a way to celebrate once you’re done!

  8. 5 stars
    I’ve seen this recipe around, too; but never had a chance to try this and you now convinced me to give it a try.

    1. Hi Linda…yes you definitely have too! 🙂 they are the best!

  9. Anne Lawton says:

    5 stars
    These are the perfect chocolate chip cookie! Crispy on the outside and soft on the inside.

  10. Thanks a lot for this recipe. I love everything New York style.

  11. 5 stars
    This is going on my baking list now that fall is here. Thanks for sharing a great recipe!

  12. Mama Maggie's Kitchen says:

    5 stars
    These chocolate chip cookies are the best. I love that it has perfect crisp edges and a soft ooey gooey chocolate middle. My son will surely love this!

  13. 5 stars
    I’ve heard about it before and I am now going to try it. I want to pack it for my son’s pack lunch. I will make them smaller for it to last forever. lol

    1. Oh they are so worth it and your son’s lunch will be the envy of everyone around him!

    1. You will love them Veena! And yes a great gift 🙂

  14. Ooh Heather these cookies look and sound perfect! I’ve been hearing about them for a while and you’ve just about convinced me that I need to try them. Though if im being honest, they’re cookies.. I really don’t need that much persuasion! 😉 I’m interested to see how the bread flour will affect the texture as I’ve never made cookies with it. Thanks for sharing!

    1. Heather @Bostongirlbakes says:

      Oh I can’t stop eating them…and I froze some for later because they are THAT good! I do want to try them again with just all purpose flour..because let’s be honest how often do you have three types of flour sitting around your house? But ENJOY!

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