9 Tips To Prevent A Soggy Pie Crust

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Making and baking your own perfect pie can be intimidating! And there’s nothing worse than ending up with a soggy pie crust. Prevent a soggy bottom pie crust with these soggy pie crust tips.

slice of apple pie on a plate


 

Making pies from scratch can a bit intimidating. And nothing is more frustrating than going to all the trouble only to end up with a soggy pie crust. Nobody likes a soggy bottom, am I right? 

And no offense to the yummy filling inside, a good pie all depends on how great the pie crust comes out. And I’ve had my fair share of soggy bottom pie crusts before. So I thought I’d pass a long a few tips so you can get a crisp, golden brown pie crust. No more soggy pie crusts for you!

How Do You Keep A Pie Crust From Getting Soggy On The Bottom?

There’s a few different tips and tricks I have for you so you can prevent that soggy pie crust in the end.

But really in the end, it’s about making sure the heat can get to it, and the moisture doesn’t!

Tip #1: Blind Bake Your Pie Crust

Blind baking your pie crust means to fully bake, or partially bake your crust before adding your filling. If you are making a no bake pie, like a Old Fashioned Coconut Cream Pie.  You want to make sure to blind bake your crust completely. 

If you are making a custard pie, like an Easy To Make Eggless Pumpkin Pie, you want to partially bake your crust. This will help the crust to set up first before adding that liquidy filling. 

When blind baking your crusts, make sure to chill it first before popping it in the oven. This will ensure it keeps it shape. And line it with foil, or parchment paper and completely fill it with either pie weights, dried beans, or uncooked rice. Fill it right to the top so it keeps the sides in place, otherwise you risk the pie sides shrinking in the oven. 

Tip #2: Brush Crusts With An Egg White

Soggy crust is the worst. So to prevent a soggy crust brush that bottom crust with an egg white with a silicone pastry brush. That egg white will create a barrier from your filling to your crust.

Got an egg allergy in the family? Corn syrup works as well. 

Pro Tip: And only keep your pie in the fridge unbaked for only a couple hours so the pie dough doesn’t absorb that filling and become soggy.

Tip #3: Use The Right Pie Plate

Those ceramic pie plates are pretty, sure. But they won’t get you the brown, crisp crust you’re after. I highly recommend a metal or cast iron pie pan for the best heat conduction. These pie pans will get you a beautifully crisp, browned crust. 

You can use a glass pie plate, so you can see the bottom of the crust and ensure it’s brown. But you may need to leave it in the oven longer. 

Tip #4: Bake On A Lower Rack

For all baking things I always recommend the center of your oven. Except pies. There always has to be an exception, right? Pies are the rebels of the baking world.

Having your pie closer to the bottom rack will help brown up that pie crust. I always place mine in the lower third of my oven.

pumpkin pie being taken out of the oven

You can also help brown up that crust, by placing your pie on a pre-heated baking sheet. I actually like to do this anyway to catch any drips from my bubbling, fruit filling!

Before you go to bake your pie, pre-heat your oven and place a baking sheet into your oven to start to warm up. Then when you go to bake your pie, place the pie right onto the baking sheet. 

Tip #6: Use Dried Breadcrumbs

You can also sprinkle dried breadcrumbs on the bottom. This will help absorb the juicy filling and prevent a barrier.

And no one will be the wiser!

Tip #7: Brush With Chocolate.

Ok this might not work for every single pie out there. But again, you can blind bake your pie crust. Let it cool completely and then brush on melted chocolate. 

A hidden layer of chocolate. Um, yes please!

Tip #8: Strain Your Filling.

A fruit pie can come with a lot of moisture. So help things out by tossing your fruit with sugar first and letting it sit. The sugar will remove some of the water from the fruit. 

After it sits, I like to strain out some of the liquid. Simply discard the liquid. Or you can boil it down into a thick syrupy liquid to pour over you fruit. 

Tip #9: Vent The Crust.

That pretty Lattice Pie Crust or just few slits in the top crust, help to vent all that steam that builds up inside from your filling cooking away. 

If it doesn’t have anywhere to go it could get absorbed into your crust!

strawberry pie with lattice top

For More Pie Baking Help Check Out These Posts:

Check Out These Pie Recipes

Happy (pie) baking!



 

4 Comments

  1. Hello Heather. I tried using 3 of your tips to avoid a soggy bottom crust while baking our Thanksgiving (Canadian) pumpkin pie. My crust was baked to perfection thanks to you. I used the egg wash coating, placing the pie plate on a metal pan and putting it on the lowest rack in the oven. Brilliant tips that I will use from now on. A bonus was the fluted edge didn’t get too dark like it usually does. Thank you so much for your advice.

    1. aw that’s amazing Donna!! I’m so happy for you!! You’re so welcome 🙂

  2. I made an apple huckleberry pie a few weeks ago. I’ve been searching for how to prevent a soggy crust so glad I came to your site. I also made a blueberry pie and both pies had a disappearing bottom crust on the second day. I told my niece about the apple huckleberry pie and she requested the pie for our yearly family cookout. Since she has to be on a gluten free diet what is your thought on using Measure for Measure GF flour for the pie crust. I put a crumble on top of the pie so only need bottom crust.

    1. Hi Shelley! Glad you found the post helpful. I’ve used measure for measure before (or was it called cup 4 cup?) but not for pie crust. You might find the crust maybe harder to work with but can’t say for sure but I think it should be fine!

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